by Pierre de Ronsard


Les villes et les bourgs me sont si odieux

Que je meurs, si je voy quelque tracette humaine:

Seulet dedans les bois pensif je me promeine,

Et rein ne m’est plaisant que les sauvages lieux.


Il n’y a dans ces bois sangliers si furieux,

Ni roc si endurci, ny ruisseau, ni fontaine,

Ny arbre tant soit sourd, que ne sache ma peine,

Et qui ne soit marri de mon mal ennuyeux.


Un penser, que renaist d’un autre, m’accompaigne

Avec un pleur amer qui tout le sein me baigne,

Travaillé de soupirs qui compaignons me sont:


Si bien, que si quelcun me trouvoit au bocage,

Voyant mon poil rebours, et l’horreur de mon front,

Ne me diroit, pas homme, ains un monstre sauvage.

A Thought

by Pierre de Ronsard

The villages and cities

are so odious to me,


I feel myself dying

if I see even a sign


of a human being.  I stay

in the deep woods, away,


and nothing pleases me except extreme,

savage places.  And yet, no scream


of a boar is furious enough,

no boulder dense enough,


no stream or waterfall or tree

deaf enough to stop the grief in me


and this evil weariness.  A thought

brings up another thought,


and with them tears that wet

my chest, pushed out by sighs that


stay my only companions.

If any person


crossed my tracks and noticed,

through the twigs, this


tangled hair

and the horror


on my face, he’d say, “That’s not a man,

it’s a monster!  Monsters have come again!”



translated from French by Diane Furtney